GNOME 3.33.3 Released, Kernel Security Updates for RHEL and CentOS, Wine Developers Concerned with Ubuntu 19.10 Dropping 32-Bit Support, Bzip2 to Get an Update and OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Now Available

News briefs for June 21, 2019.

GNOME 3.33.3 was released yesterday. Note that this release is development code and is intended for testing purposes. Go here to see the list of modules and changes, get the BuildStream project snapshot here or get the source packages here.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Linux have received new kernel security updates to address the recent TCP vulnerabilities. Softpedia News reports that "The new Linux kernel security updates patch an integer overflow flaw (CVE-2019-11477) discovered by Jonathan Looney in Linux kernel's networking subsystem processed TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACK) segments, which could allow a remote attacker to cause a so-called SACK Panic attack (denial of service) by sending malicious sequences of SACK segments on a TCP connection that has a small TCP MSS value." Update immediately.

Wine developers are concerned with Ubuntu's decision to drop 32-bit support with Ubuntu 19.10. From Linux Uprising: "The Wine developers are concerned with this news because many 64-bit Windows applications still use a 32-bit installer, or some 32-bit components." See the wine-devel mailing list for the discussion.

Bzip2 is about to get its first update since September 2010. According to Phoronix, the new version will include new build systems and security fixes, among other things. See Federico's blog post for details.

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 was released recently. One major change for OM Lx 4 is switching from rpm5/URPMI to rpm.org/DNF for package management. This change requires users to learn new commands if they use command line, DNF. See the OpenMandriva wiki for all the details and go here to install.

Jill Franklin is an editorial professional with more than 17 years experience in technical and scientific publishing, both print and digital. As Executive Editor of Linux Journal, she wrangles writers, develops content, manages projects, meets deadlines and makes sentences sparkle. She also was Managing Editor for TUX and Embedded Linux Journal, and the book Linux in the Workplace. Before entering the Linux and open-source realm, she was Managing Editor of several scientific and scholarly journals, including Veterinary Pathology, The Journal of Mammalogy, Toxicologic Pathology and The Journal of Scientific Exploration. In a previous life, she taught English literature and composition, managed a bookstore and tended bar. When she’s not bugging writers about deadlines or editing copy, she throws pots, gardens and reads. You can contact Jill via e-mail, [email protected]

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